marine biology

Weanlings Rest Stop

These two seals kept us busy today! Both of our rehabilitation facilities, National Marine Life Center and Mystic Aquarium, are full. So we monitor the animals and relocate them if necessary.
The first animal is a harbor seal pup, likely newly weaned from Mom. She is alert and responsive, but thin and dehydrated. She is

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Salisbury Beach Gray Seal Relocation

During the past two days, our team has been monitoring a yearling male gray seal on Salisbury Beach. As you can see from the photo, he is suffering from a serious case of alopecia/hair loss. This has been found in gray seals to be caused by a fungal infection and sometimes in conjunction with a

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Rare Blue Lobster Molting

Watch our a rare blue American Lobster (Homarus americanus) molting is this sped-up video. This blue lobster is only about one in about 5 million; a blue lobster is missing most of its red and yellow pigments.
When a lobster grows too big for its carapace, it struggles out of it. At the same

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Oiled Wildlife Rehabilitation Workshop

Marine Mammal Rescue staff Ashley Stokes and Sarah Toupin recently attended a two day workshop led by TriState Oiled Wildlife Response, NH Department of Environmental Services, and NH Fishand Game to learn tactics used for capture, washing, and rehabilitating oiled wildlife. In addition to learning how oil impacts animals, they also learned about the policies

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On the Brink of Harbor Seal Pupping Season

 
Ashley Stokes | Marine Mammal Rescue Manager
Harbor seals typically give birth during the months of May and June but occasionally pupping season begins early due to warmer water temperatures. Also, just like other mammals, some harbor seals will give birth to their pup prematurely. Last year we responded to our first premature pup on

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Lumpfish

With its triangular shape, beautiful coloration, unique ability to adhere itself vertically to submerged structures and engaging face, the lumpfish is a favorite of Seacoast Science Center staff and visitors. Aquarist Rob Royer shares the fact about the lumpfish that reside at the Center.
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Sea Star Wasting Disease

 
Mike Doherty | Program Naturalist
If you visited the Center recently, you may have noticed an odd-looking sea star or two. That is because many of them had begun to autotomise their own arms, meaning purposefully disconnecting them from their bodies.
Sea stars are known drop limbs for a number of reasons; one being

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Mike Doherty brings passion to ocean education

Heidi Duncanson | Development and Communications Coordinator
Seacoast Science Center’s newest full-time staff member brings a depth of personal experiences and study that increases the caliber of our ocean education programs, in conjunction with today’s STEM standards. From SCUBA diving in Hawaii to hiking in Ecuador, Mike Doherty’s passion for nature and undergraduate education make

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#OceanRunnerNH: Sea Life Winter Adaptations

What happens to sea creatures when temperatures dip below freezing? Ocean Runner Nichole visited the shore with SSC Naturalist Sarah Toupin to find our how animals adapt to winter weather.
Help Ocean Runner fund a new program, Healthy Ocean or Bust Bandits, a community action ocean conservation program to be launched in 2017, that

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Octopus Challenge: Day 2

Octopus are among the most unique beings on Earth. They possess a complex genomic structure that rivals the most intelligent mammals. These invertebrate cephalopods are capable problem solvers and masters of illusion.
Currently, the Seacoast Science Center has two Pacific Red Octopus (Octopus rubenscens) on display. In this video series, you can observe their

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