creature features

#OceanRunnerNH: Who’s drilling holes in the shells?

Ocean Runner Nichole is curious about the perfect little round holes she has seen on empty periwinkle, mussel and clam shells. Seacoast Science Center’s Ashley Stokes explains how some snails are herbivores (plant eaters) and some, omnivores (meat eaters). Omnivores, such as dog whelks and moon snails, use their radula to “drill” a hole in

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Inflatable Whale Visits SSC

Our summer campers got to learn about whales in a unique way: by climbing inside one! Staff members from the Blue Ocean Society recently brought their inflatable baleen whale named Ladder to the Seacoast Science Center. Our campers were able to go inside to see the whale’s skeleton and organs, and learn how whales

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Seahorses: The Super Dads of the Sea

Ashley Breault | Marketing Intern | Ocean Studies and Communications Student at University of New England
Father’s Day is a great time to thank all the dads out there who step up their game for life’s most important job! Inarguably, the most notable dad in the animal kingdom, the seahorse, has some pretty unique traits that qualify them for the

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#OceanRunnerNH: Sea Scallops Gallop?

SSC’s Ocean Runner Nichole Rutherford is running along the rocky shore at Odiorne Point State Park and spots a scallop shell. Not knowing much about sea scallops, other than how great they are for dinner, Ocean Runner heads to the Seacoast Science Center to learn more from Program Naturalist Ben Flynn.
View Previous Ocean

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#OceanRunnerNH: Periwinkles Don’t Run!

#OceanRunner Nichole Rutherford is running along the rocky beach at Odiorne Point State Park and spots what she thinks is a fast moving periwinkle. When she stops to take a closer look she discovers it is actually a hermit crab. Ocean Runner heads to the Seacoast Science Center to learn more from Program Naturalist

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Northern Sea Star Feeding

Watch this short video to see the sea star’s inverted stomach! The sea star has a feeding method unlike any other; it secures its prey with its tube feet and pries it open—like the shells of bivalve (clams and mussels are favorites!), and then ejects its stomach from its own body, placing it over the digestible parts of

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Northern Rock Barnacles Feeding

Northern Rock Barnacles (Balanus balanoides) are crustaceans that attach themselves permanently to a hard substrate. They begin life as free swimming larvae and when it comes to settle, they “glue” their heads to hard surfaces, such as rocks, ships, pilings, and other hard-surfaced animals. Shell plates form to enclose the shrimp-like larvae that grow throughout

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#OceanRunnerNH Introduces the Seacoast Science Center’s new Video Blog

Seacoast Science Center’s Nichole Rutherford introduces the new #OceanRunnerNH Video Blog. Follow the Ocean Runner as she runs along the coast of New Hampshire and Southern Maine to raise awareness of our ocean environment and promote ocean health. Filled with questions about what she sees along the way, the Ocean Runner looks to her

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Rare Orange Lobster Molting

Watch an American Lobster’s (Homarus americanus) molting is this sped-up video, narrated by Seacoast Science Center Aquarist Rob Royer.
This rare orange lobster was in one of our tanks when we spotted it beginning to molt. Because it is more vulnerable to predation when it sheds its hard exoskeleton, we moved it to safety during

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