Creature Features

A Harbor Seal’s Journey: Rescue, Release, and Beyond!

 
Originally published February 12, 2021
 
 JUNE 7, 2021 UPDATE
 

Held on June 7th, this webinar provides an update on Harbor Seal #087 from Robert A. DiGiovanni, Jr., Founder and Chief Scientist at
Atlantic Marine Conservation Society, who tagged the seal, as well as insight on his 30+ years of research. SSC’s Marine Mammal

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Where have all the Ice Seals gone?

 
Ashley Stokes | Marine Mammal Rescue Manager
New Englanders are accustomed to seeing harbor seals and their larger gray seal cousins on our coast’s sandy beaches and rocky shores. But did you know that during the winter season, two very unique visitors venture down from the Arctic (and we’re not talking about Santa Claus and his

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Shark and Seal Safety in New England Waters

Seacoast Science Center Marine Mammal Rescue was featured on WMUR TV9’s NH Chronicle on October 8, 2020. MMR Manager Ashley Stokes, along with partner Marianne Long from Atlantic White Shark Conservancy, shared insight on shark and seal populations in the Gulf of Maine, and guidelines for seal viewing and recreating safely in ocean waters.

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Sharks, Seals, and a Healthy Ocean Ecosystem

 
Brian Yurasits | Marine Mammal Rescue Community Outreach Manager
This week Maine experienced its first-ever fatal great white shark attack, leaving many New England residents shocked and in search of answers. While we aren’t shark experts here at Seacoast Science Center, our Marine Mammal Rescue Team offers unique insight into the complicated dance between

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That’s A-Moray!

 
Lauren Bucciero | Marketing Intern
Recently, I had the opportunity to visit the Center to explore the new living coral tanks in the Restoring Reefs exhibit in the Eversource Gallery. I was immediately captivated by the spotted creature I saw emerging from its hiding spot. It quickly slid out of its network of PVC

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Two-Spot Octopus: Babies!

Video by Daryn Clevesy | Visitor Program Coordinator
Story by Lauren Bucciero | Marketing Intern
This March, Seacoast Science Center welcomed some new baby critters! We were fortunate to receive a female two-spot octopus with eggs from our colleagues at Dartmouth College. Octopuses lay their eggs over the course of a few months, therefore,

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Where are all the sea stars?

by Kate Leavitt | Director of Mission

We get this question a lot. Nearly every day, visitors ask our naturalists why they can’t find sea stars in our Tide Pool Touch Tank anymore. It’s not because these animals are really good at hiding, or that we’ve forgotten to put any in the tank. Unfortunately,

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Seahorse Courtship

Lined Seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) mate for life and are monogamous. The male typically courts the female for several days before mating. Females produce eggs and deposit them in the male’s pouch, where he incubates them for approximately 21 days. Uniquely, the male gives birth to the young and can have 100-1,000 babies at one time!
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Moon Jellies

Moon jellies, like the ones on exhibit at the Seacoast Science Center, are found off the New England shore and in the ocean world-wide. Naturalist Nikki presents an overview of how they move, eat, and more.
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Chain Catshark Sensors

Chain catsharks (a.k.a. chain dogfish) are named after their cat-like eyes and chain-link pattern. Serving as camouflage, along with its white belly, the chain pattern looks like waves in the ocean to its predators. The shark’s sensory lateral line and ampullae of Lorenzini (on the shark’s snout) help sense changes in the water and locate

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