May 2016

SSC announces new incentives for its supporters

The Seacoast Science Center kicked off its 2016 Annual Fund Campaign in April with the introduction of new benefits for higher levels of giving. The Center’s new Annual Giving Societies, for those who donate $300 or more, were created to recognize and motivate donors to step up their giving.
“The Seacoast Science Center relies on

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Harbor Seal Pupping Season is Underway!

Harbor seals bear their young during the months of May and June. As a result, the chance of seeing seals on our beaches, and more specifically seal pups, increases. If you see a seal on the beach, it is important to keep back and call the Seacoast Science Center’s Marine Mammal Rescue (MMR) hotline

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SSC launches Ocean Runner video blog series

Bringing together her love of ocean education and beach running, the Seacoast Science Center’s Development Director Nichole Rutherford, of York, Maine, is hosting a year-long video blog series that offers expert answers to common questions about coastal ecosystems. Dubbed the Ocean Runner, Nichole will appear in weekly video blogs tackling subjects from tides and

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Chain Catsharks

SSC Naturalist Ben Flynn presents a creature feature on the chain catsharks (Scyliorhinus retifer) that reside in the Seacoast Science Center’s Close Encounters Tank. Visitors can pet sharks, too, during a Close Encounters program. Check our daily schedule and plan to pet the sharks during your visit!
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#OceanRunnerNH: Rescue Run Recap

SSC’s Marketing Director Karen Provazza recaps the 8th annual Rescue Run: Race for Marine Mammals and Kid’s Fun Run, held April 23, 2016. Despite the rain, the event was more popular than ever, with over 700 people hitting the trails of Odiorne Point State Park to benefit Marine Mammal Rescue in New Hampshire, including

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Harbor Porpoise and Year-to-Date Update

On Sunday, May 1st, we responded to a call about a deceased harbor porpoise on a Salisbury, MA beach. The emaciated male weanling was picked up and transported him to the New England Aquarium’s Quincy facility for necropsy (autopsy for animals). It is likely that the young porpoise passed from failure to thrive.
Species breakdown

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