marine biology

Findings show minke whale died of entanglement in fishing gear

By JASON SCHREIBER
Union Leader Correspondent
October 18. 2018 11:11PM

A dead minke whale washed up on Jenness State Beach last month. Findings show died due to entanglement in legal fishing gear. (Jason Schreiber/Correspondent)
RYE — Preliminary results of a necropsy have found that a minke whale that washed up on Jenness State Beach last

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Minke whale found dead at Jenness Beach

Elizabeth Dinan
seacoastonline.com

Posted Sep 17, 2018 at 12:57 PM. Updated Sep 18, 2018 at 8:30 AM. 

 

RYE — A juvenile minke whale was found dead at Jenness Beach Monday morning and environmental professionals are calling the death part of a larger trend.
Police Chief Kevin Walsh said the whale was found at about 6 a.m. by

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Scientists eye influenza, pollution in spike in seal deaths

By Amanda Getchell
newburyportnews.com
Aug 22, 2018

As the number of dead or stranded live seals washing up along the coast from northern Massachusetts to southern Maine continues to increase dramatically, marine mammal experts are considering influenza or environmental pollution as potential explanations.
Although there is no definitive cause for the uptick in seal deaths

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Moon Jellies

Moon jellies, like the ones on exhibit at the Seacoast Science Center, are found off the New England shore and in the ocean world-wide. Naturalist Nikki presents an overview of how they move, eat, and more.
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Mack the harp seal swims free!

On Sunday, March 18, 2018, the Seacoast Science Center Marine Mammal Rescue Team (MMRT) released Mack the harp seal back into the wild. A “poster-child of a healthy harp seal,” Mack was fit, fat, and ready for his swim back to the Arctic after four weeks of care at the National Marine Life Center.

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Cuttlefish: Masters of Camouflage!

Although cuttlefish cannot see color, they have amazing color-changing abilities! Referred to as the “chameleons of the sea,” cuttlefish can instantly change their skin color to communicate to other cuttlefish and to camouflage. Common Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) are cephalopods (meaning head-footed), and are in a group of mollusks that also include octopus and squid,

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Marine Mammal Rescue goes on the road

The Seacoast Science Center is widely known for on-site tide-pooling field trips but naturalists from the Center also bring educational programs out into the community. Recently, SSC Marine Mammal Rescue team leader Ashley Stokes visited St. Michael Parish School in Lowell, MA and presented information about marine mammals to students in grades 2 and

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Gray Seal Pup Sampling on Monomoy Island

 
Ashley Stokes | SSC Marine Mammal Rescue Manager
Monomoy Island, off of Chatham Massachusetts, is a known rookery and birthing site for gray seals. Gray seals are the larger, more aggressive relatives of the harbor seal that is typically seen up here in New Hampshire. From January 13-16th, Sarah and I teamed up with 13

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Here Come the Sea Squirts!

From UNH Today | originally published Monday, February 5, 2018
Warmer ocean temperatures will accelerate reproduction in invasive tunicates

 
They’re lovingly called “sea squirts,” but these marine soft-bodied animals, or tunicates, could cause a giant-sized problem in cold water areas like the Gulf of Maine.
New UNH research indicates

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Seahorse Dads Giving Birth

Our Lined Seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) recently gave birth! A female seahorse deposits hundreds of eggs into a male’s brood pouch, where they are fertilized. The male broods the eggs for about 20 days, providing nutrients for growth and development. The eggs hatch in the pouch and the male gives birth. After the young are

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