gulf of maine

Moon Jellies

Moon jellies, like the ones on exhibit at the Seacoast Science Center, are found off the New England shore and in the ocean world-wide. Naturalist Nikki presents an overview of how they move, eat, and more.
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The Amazing Ocean Pout

Ocean Pout have an antifreeze protein that allows them to live in near freezing waters off the coast of New England and Canada. Scientists have succeeded in taking genes from ocean pout and implanting them into Atlantic Salmon. The promoter for the antifreeze protein gene is used in conjunction with a growth hormone gene

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Spring Tide Pooling in Odiorne Point Sate Park, continued

SSC Aquarist Rob Royer continues exploring in the springtime tide pools of Odiorne Point State Park. This time he finds a rock crab, green crab, and rock gunnel.
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Seacoast Science Center opens Discovery Dock early learning exhibit

 
The Seacoast Science Center announces the opening of its newest exhibit: Jumpin’ Jay’s Discovery Dock. The adventure play space is designed to spark the imaginations of young learners as they step into action in a “working waterfront.”
Sponsored by Jumpin’ Jays Fish Café of Portsmouth, this exhibit is part of a major exhibit enhancement

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Spring Tide Pooling in Odiorne Point State Park

SSC Aquarist Rob Royer heads down to tide pools of Odiorne Point State Park in early spring to take a look at some of the algae and finds young species and species in their reproductive stage, ready to release their eggs.
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See Mack the harp seal swim free in drone video

On Sunday, March 18, 2018, the Seacoast Science Center Marine Mammal Rescue Team (MMRT) released Mack the harp seal back into the wild. After four weeks of care at the National Marine Life Center Mack was ready for his swim back to the Arctic. Nearly 1,000 people witnessed the event, held on the same

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Mack the harp seal swims free!

On Sunday, March 18, 2018, the Seacoast Science Center Marine Mammal Rescue Team (MMRT) released Mack the harp seal back into the wild. A “poster-child of a healthy harp seal,” Mack was fit, fat, and ready for his swim back to the Arctic after four weeks of care at the National Marine Life Center.

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Here Come the Sea Squirts!

From UNH Today | originally published Monday, February 5, 2018
Warmer ocean temperatures will accelerate reproduction in invasive tunicates

 
They’re lovingly called “sea squirts,” but these marine soft-bodied animals, or tunicates, could cause a giant-sized problem in cold water areas like the Gulf of Maine.
New UNH research indicates

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Touch Tank Renovation: 2 weeks in 34 seconds!

We’ve completed the renovation of our iconic indoor Tide Pool Touch Tank! The exhibit is now equipped with new observation tools and interpretive signage designed to inspire visitors to “dive deeper” into learning about the animals and plants that live in the intertidal zone of the Gulf of Maine. After visiting the exhibit, we

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Seacoast Science Center renovates iconic Tide Pool Touch Tank exhibit

To kick off a year of major exhibit upgrades, the Seacoast Science Center has completed renovation of its iconic Tide Pool Touch Tank. This popular hands-on exhibit has been fully refurbished and now includes observation tools, interpretive signage with learning prompts, and naturalist-guided programs to help visitors “dive deeper” into learning about the animals

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