creature features

Here Come the Sea Squirts!

From UNH Today | originally published Monday, February 5, 2018
Warmer ocean temperatures will accelerate reproduction in invasive tunicates

 
They’re lovingly called “sea squirts,” but these marine soft-bodied animals, or tunicates, could cause a giant-sized problem in cold water areas like the Gulf of Maine.
New UNH research indicates

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Red Lionfish

The red lionfish (Pterois volitans) is a venomous coral reef fish that makes its way all the way up to the Gulf of Maine during the warmer summer months. Native to the Indo-Pacific region, lionfish were accidentally introduced into the Western Atlantic. Because they have no known predators, they have become an invasive species.

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#OceanRunnerNH: Seal on the Beach?

Ocean Runner Nichole finds SSC’s Marine Mammal Rescue volunteer Patty Adell monitoring a gray seal on a Hampton, NH beach during her afternoon run. Patty fills her in on what to do and not do if you encounter a seal on the beach (dead or alive): stay back and call the MMR hotline at

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Swordfish Washes Up on Rye Beach

Karen Provazza | Director of Marketing
On Monday, September 12, 2016, our Marine Mammal Rescue Manager Ashley Stokes received an unusual report: a swordfish washed up on Cable Beach in Rye. While not a marine mammal, our Rescue Team was eager to assess the situation and equipped to remove the carcass from the beach.
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#OceanRunnerNH: Who’s drilling holes in the shells?

Ocean Runner Nichole is curious about the perfect little round holes she has seen on empty periwinkle, mussel and clam shells. Seacoast Science Center’s Ashley Stokes explains how some snails are herbivores (plant eaters) and some, omnivores (meat eaters). Omnivores, such as dog whelks and moon snails, use their radula to “drill” a hole in

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Inflatable Whale Visits SSC

Our summer campers got to learn about whales in a unique way: by climbing inside one! Staff members from the Blue Ocean Society recently brought their inflatable baleen whale named Ladder to the Seacoast Science Center. Our campers were able to go inside to see the whale’s skeleton and organs, and learn how whales

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Seahorses: The Super Dads of the Sea

Ashley Breault | Marketing Intern | Ocean Studies and Communications Student at University of New England
Father’s Day is a great time to thank all the dads out there who step up their game for life’s most important job! Inarguably, the most notable dad in the animal kingdom, the seahorse, has some pretty unique traits that qualify them for the

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#OceanRunnerNH: Sea Scallops Gallop?

SSC’s Ocean Runner Nichole Rutherford is running along the rocky shore at Odiorne Point State Park and spots a scallop shell. Not knowing much about sea scallops, other than how great they are for dinner, Ocean Runner heads to the Seacoast Science Center to learn more from Program Naturalist Ben Flynn.
View Previous Ocean

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#OceanRunnerNH: Periwinkles Don’t Run!

#OceanRunner Nichole Rutherford is running along the rocky beach at Odiorne Point State Park and spots what she thinks is a fast moving periwinkle. When she stops to take a closer look she discovers it is actually a hermit crab. Ocean Runner heads to the Seacoast Science Center to learn more from Program Naturalist

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Northern Sea Star Feeding

Watch this short video to see the sea star’s inverted stomach! The sea star has a feeding method unlike any other; it secures its prey with its tube feet and pries it open—like the shells of bivalve (clams and mussels are favorites!), and then ejects its stomach from its own body, placing it over the digestible parts of

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