Creature Features

The Horseshoe Crab: A Living Dinosaur

Ashley Breault | Marketing Intern | Ocean Studies and Communications Student at University of New England

Horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, are one of the many fascinating ocean animals you can find in the marsh of Odiorne Point State Park, right outside the doors of the Seacoast Science Center. Despite their name, horseshoe crabs are

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#OceanRunnerNH: Sea Scallops Gallop?

SSC’s Ocean Runner Nichole Rutherford is running along the rocky shore at Odiorne Point State Park and spots a scallop shell. Not knowing much about sea scallops, other than how great they are for dinner, Ocean Runner heads to the Seacoast Science Center to learn more from Program Naturalist Ben Flynn.
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Chain Catsharks

SSC Naturalist Ben Flynn presents a creature feature on the chain catsharks (Scyliorhinus retifer) that reside in the Seacoast Science Center’s Close Encounters Tank. Visitors can pet sharks, too, during a Close Encounters program. Check our daily schedule and plan to pet the sharks during your visit!
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Northern Sea Star Feeding

Watch this short video to see the sea star’s inverted stomach! The sea star has a feeding method unlike any other; it secures its prey with its tube feet and pries it open—like the shells of bivalve (clams and mussels are favorites!), and then ejects its stomach from its own body, placing it over the digestible parts of

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Northern Rock Barnacles Feeding

Northern Rock Barnacles (Balanus balanoides) are crustaceans that attach themselves permanently to a hard substrate. They begin life as free swimming larvae and when it comes to settle, they “glue” their heads to hard surfaces, such as rocks, ships, pilings, and other hard-surfaced animals. Shell plates form to enclose the shrimp-like larvae that grow throughout

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Rare Orange Lobster Molting

Watch an American Lobster’s (Homarus americanus) molting is this sped-up video, narrated by Seacoast Science Center Aquarist Rob Royer.
This rare orange lobster was in one of our tanks when we spotted it beginning to molt. Because it is more vulnerable to predation when it sheds its hard exoskeleton, we moved it to safety during

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