Creature Features

Coral Bleaching

Live, healthy coral has algae in its outer tissue layer, living in a symbiotic relationship. When coral is under stress, from water chemistry, temperature changes or other factors, it expels the algae to protect itself. This process is called coral bleaching. While coral reefs occupy only 1% of the ocean, they hold approximately 25%

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New Coral Reefs Exhibit

SSC Aquarist Rob Royer introduces the new Coral Reefs exhibit and talks about some of the warm water corals, fish, and anemones that reside in the tank.
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Red Lionfish

The red lionfish (Pterois volitans) is a venomous coral reef fish that makes its way all the way up to the Gulf of Maine during the warmer summer months. Native to the Indo-Pacific region, lionfish were accidentally introduced into the Western Atlantic. Because they have no known predators, they have become an invasive species.

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#OceanRunnerNH: Seal on the Beach?

Ocean Runner Nichole finds SSC’s Marine Mammal Rescue volunteer Patty Adell monitoring a gray seal on a Hampton, NH beach during her afternoon run. Patty fills her in on what to do and not do if you encounter a seal on the beach (dead or alive): stay back and call the MMR hotline at

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Rare Blue Lobster Molting

Watch our a rare blue American Lobster (Homarus americanus) molting is this sped-up video. This blue lobster is only about one in about 5 million; a blue lobster is missing most of its red and yellow pigments.
When a lobster grows too big for its carapace, it struggles out of it. At the same

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Behold the octopus: Problem solver, tool user and now, gene editor

 
Ben Locwin | Originally posted April 20, 2017 | Genetic Literacy Project
There are a few things to learn about octopuses: First – the plural of ‘octopus’ is indeed ‘octopuses,’ not ‘octopi.’ Second – they are thought to be, by far, the smartest invertebrates on the planet. They  use tools, solve mazes and puzzles, and

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Lumpfish

With its triangular shape, beautiful coloration, unique ability to adhere itself vertically to submerged structures and engaging face, the lumpfish is a favorite of Seacoast Science Center staff and visitors. Aquarist Rob Royer shares the fact about the lumpfish that reside at the Center.
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Sea Star Wasting Disease

 
Mike Doherty | Program Naturalist
If you visited the Center recently, you may have noticed an odd-looking sea star or two. That is because many of them had begun to autotomise their own arms, meaning purposefully disconnecting them from their bodies.
Sea stars are known drop limbs for a number of reasons; one being

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Octopus Challenge: Day 2

Octopus are among the most unique beings on Earth. They possess a complex genomic structure that rivals the most intelligent mammals. These invertebrate cephalopods are capable problem solvers and masters of illusion.
Currently, the Seacoast Science Center has two Pacific Red Octopus (Octopus rubenscens) on display. In this video series, you can observe their

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#OceanRunnerNH: Tide Pool Touch Tank

Ocean Runner Nichole learns about tide pool ecology from naturalist Kate Leavitt at the Seacoast Science Center, and gets hands-on with some of the cool critters that inhabit the tank, including sea stars, urchins, hermit crabs, periwinkles, and more.
Help Ocean Runner fund a new program, Healthy Ocean or Bust Bandits, a community action

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