Creature Features

Mack the harp seal swims free!

On Sunday, March 18, 2018, the Seacoast Science Center Marine Mammal Rescue Team (MMRT) released Mack the harp seal back into the wild. A “poster-child of a healthy harp seal,” Mack was fit, fat, and ready for his swim back to the Arctic after four weeks of care at the National Marine Life Center.

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Cuttlefish: Masters of Camouflage!

Although cuttlefish cannot see color, they have amazing color-changing abilities! Referred to as the “chameleons of the sea,” cuttlefish can instantly change their skin color to communicate to other cuttlefish and to camouflage. Common Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) are cephalopods (meaning head-footed), and are in a group of mollusks that also include octopus and squid,

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Here Come the Sea Squirts!

From UNH Today | originally published Monday, February 5, 2018
Warmer ocean temperatures will accelerate reproduction in invasive tunicates

They’re lovingly called “sea squirts,” but these marine soft-bodied animals, or tunicates, could cause a giant-sized problem in cold water areas like the Gulf of Maine.
New UNH research indicates

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Seahorse Dads Giving Birth

Our Lined Seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) recently gave birth! A female seahorse deposits hundreds of eggs into a male’s brood pouch, where they are fertilized. The male broods the eggs for about 20 days, providing nutrients for growth and development. The eggs hatch in the pouch and the male gives birth. After the young are

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Feeding time for Cuttlefish

Our new cuttlefish are growing quickly! Common Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) are cephalopods (meaning head-footed), and are in a group of mollusks that also include octopus and squid, the most intelligent of all invertebrates. Cuttlefish are active predators that quickly snatch their prey with a sucker-pad at the end of a long tentacle, bringing it

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Project Puffin: Protecting Seabird Islands in the Gulf of Maine

AubreyAlamshah | SSC Naturalist
In the summer of 2015 I started working at Project Puffin, a seabird restoration program run through the National Audubon Society. I’ve worked there in some capacity every summer since then and the things I learned there have helped me a great deal at my job at the Seacoast Science Center. Read More

Atlantic Purple Sea Urchin

The Atlantic Purple Sea Urchin (Arbacia punctulata) is native to the North Atlantic and found along the coasts of North America from Massachusetts, southward to the Yucatan Peninsula.
They can reach up to 8 cm in diameter. Its shell (test) is covered with tube feet used for mobility and camouflage. Five tooth-like plates on

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The Common Spider Crab

The Common Spider Crab (Libinia emarginata), also known as the Decorator Crab, is round and spiny, with long legs that can reach around its body to attach bits of algae, shell, and seaweed to the many fine, sticky hairs on its carapace for camouflage. Found in the Atlantic Ocean, from Nova Scotia to the

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The Flounder: Master of Camouflage

SSC Aquarist Rob Royer showcases the flounder that are on exhibit at the Seacoast Science Center and explains their fascinating color-changing ability and the unique development of different species.
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Coral Reef Restoration

Seacoast Science Center Aquarist Rob Royer recently traveled to Key Largo, FL to assist the Coral Restoration Foundation with their coral reef regrowth efforts. Learn about their work in this video (underwater footage shot by Rob), and more about coral reef habitats and their decline at the Center’s new Coral Reefs exhibit.
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