Blog

Learn about our latest efforts to promote ocean health, enjoy amazing creature features, and discover what happens behind the SSC scenes. Follow #OceanRunnerNH to join the Healthy Ocean or Bust movement.

Here Come the Sea Squirts!

From UNH Today | originally published Monday, February 5, 2018
Warmer ocean temperatures will accelerate reproduction in invasive tunicates

 
They’re lovingly called “sea squirts,” but these marine soft-bodied animals, or tunicates, could cause a giant-sized problem in cold water areas like the Gulf of Maine.
New UNH research indicates

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Seahorse Dads Giving Birth

Our Lined Seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) recently gave birth! A female seahorse deposits hundreds of eggs into a male’s brood pouch, where they are fertilized. The male broods the eggs for about 20 days, providing nutrients for growth and development. The eggs hatch in the pouch and the male gives birth. After the young are

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Touch Tank Renovation: 2 weeks in 34 seconds!

We’ve completed the renovation of our iconic indoor Tide Pool Touch Tank! The exhibit is now equipped with new observation tools and interpretive signage designed to inspire visitors to “dive deeper” into learning about the animals and plants that live in the intertidal zone of the Gulf of Maine. After visiting the exhibit, we

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Seacoast Science Center renovates iconic Tide Pool Touch Tank exhibit

To kick off a year of major exhibit upgrades, the Seacoast Science Center has completed renovation of its iconic Tide Pool Touch Tank. This popular hands-on exhibit has been fully refurbished and now includes observation tools, interpretive signage with learning prompts, and naturalist-guided programs to help visitors “dive deeper” into learning about the animals

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Feeding time for Cuttlefish

Our new cuttlefish are growing quickly! Common Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) are cephalopods (meaning head-footed), and are in a group of mollusks that also include octopus and squid, the most intelligent of all invertebrates. Cuttlefish are active predators that quickly snatch their prey with a sucker-pad at the end of a long tentacle, bringing it

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Project Puffin: Protecting Seabird Islands in the Gulf of Maine

AubreyAlamshah | SSC Naturalist
In the summer of 2015 I started working at Project Puffin, a seabird restoration program run through the National Audubon Society. I’ve worked there in some capacity every summer since then and the things I learned there have helped me a great deal at my job at the Seacoast Science Center. Read More


Rye Lions Club donates Viewing Telescope

The Rye Lions Club recently donated a SeeCoast Mark I Telescope to the Seacoast Science Center in Rye. The viewer will be installed on the seaside lawn of the Center in Odiorne Point State Park this spring.
The telescope has an optical power of 20X, which will allow objects and views to appear 20 times closer.

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Happy Holidays from the crew at SSC

From our family to yours, we wish you a joyous holiday season and a new year filled with exciting new discoveries.
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Atlantic Purple Sea Urchin

The Atlantic Purple Sea Urchin (Arbacia punctulata) is native to the North Atlantic and found along the coasts of North America from Massachusetts, southward to the Yucatan Peninsula.
They can reach up to 8 cm in diameter. Its shell (test) is covered with tube feet used for mobility and camouflage. Five tooth-like plates on

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Sustainable Fisheries

Mike Doherty | Program Naturalist
The ocean provides an incredible source of food. In fact, it is the primary source of protein for more than 3 billion people on Earth. As New Englanders, we are fortunate to have multiple options available to us when it comes to seafood. Lobster, fish and chips, and fried clams

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