Blog

Learn about our latest efforts to promote ocean health, enjoy amazing creature features, and discover what happens behind the SSC scenes. Follow #OceanRunnerNH to join the Healthy Ocean or Bust movement.

Master’s Degree Research Trip to Namibia

by Emma Carey | Program Assistant
It has been a lifelong dream of mine to travel to Africa to see all of the amazing wildlife that inhabits the continent. This past July, I was able to realize this dream through Miami University of Ohio’s Project Dragonfly graduate program, which took me to the beautiful country

Read More

Meet Jim Brown, Director of Major Gifts

Jim Brown joined our crew in July as the Center’s first Major Gifts officer and is responsible for the Seacoast Science Center’s major-gift fundraising and planned giving program.
Dear Friends,
Since moving to the Seacoast of New Hampshire more than 20 years ago, the Seacoast Science Center and Odiorne Point State Park have been

Read More

Fin Whale skeleton moving on to higher education

The fin whale skeleton that was located by the Center’s main entrance, has moved on to a new home: Knox College in Galesburg, IL. As part of a renovation of their science building, the skeleton will be featured in its large atrium that will face outward toward the campus.
Collected by Seacoast Science Center

Read More

Moon Jellies

Moon jellies, like the ones on exhibit at the Seacoast Science Center, are found off the New England shore and in the ocean world-wide. Naturalist Nikki presents an overview of how they move, eat, and more.
View Previous Post

Read More

Chain Catshark Sensors

Chain catsharks (a.k.a. chain dogfish) are named after their cat-like eyes and chain-link pattern. Serving as camouflage, along with its white belly, the chain pattern looks like waves in the ocean to its predators. The shark’s sensory lateral line and ampullae of Lorenzini (on the shark’s snout) help sense changes in the water and locate

Read More

Smithsonian Exhibition Exploring the Global Water Story on exhibit at the Seacoast Science Center

H2O Today, an exhibit organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, is on display at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye now through November 11, 2019. Here, SSC Exhibit Director Jeremy LeClair explains the interactive component Your Weight In Water to young visitors. The exhibition helps guests gain a better understanding of the

Read More

Harbor Seal Pupping Season is Underway

If you see a seal on the beach, call the Seacoast Science Center Marine Mammal Rescue hotline at 603-997-9448
Rye, NH — Harbor seals bear their young during the months of May and June. As a result, the chance of seeing seals on our beaches, more specifically seal pups, increases. If you see a seal

Read More

The Amazing Ocean Pout

Ocean Pout have an antifreeze protein that allows them to live in near freezing waters off the coast of New England and Canada. Scientists have succeeded in taking genes from ocean pout and implanting them into Atlantic Salmon. The promoter for the antifreeze protein gene is used in conjunction with a growth hormone gene

Read More

Seacoast Science Center now responding to marine mammals in northern MA

Newburyport, MA — Seacoast Science Center Marine Mammal Rescue (MMR) has officially expanded its territory beyond the New Hampshire coast and is now responsible for responding to all calls of marine mammals on the shore from Essex, MA, north to the New Hampshire/Maine border.
In 2014, NOAA Marine Fisheries granted a stranding agreement to the

Read More

Spring Tide Pooling in Odiorne Point Sate Park, continued

SSC Aquarist Rob Royer continues exploring in the springtime tide pools of Odiorne Point State Park. This time he finds a rock crab, green crab, and rock gunnel.
View Previous Post

Read More